Building Philanthropy for a Better Florida

Public Policy

FPN Advocacy & Public Policy

Florida Philanthropic Network plays an active role in representing philanthropy in Florida and in advocating on behalf of philanthropy in Florida. FPN focuses its public policy work on the state level, but also is active in representing philanthropy with Florida's congressional delegation.
 

FPN's Public Policy Principles

Six basic principles drive the public policy work of Florida Philanthropic Network.
 
Principles regarding philanthropy's right to participate in the public square:
  • Advocate for full participation of foundations, corporate giving programs and nonprofits in public policy dialogue and advocacy that affects their organizations, communities and the people they serve.
  • Recognize and support the role of foundations as stewards of resources for the public good to strengthen and improve the health and vitality of communities and residents.

Principles regarding the philanthropy field and what we expect of ourselves:

  • Encourage charitable giving.
  • Encourage the growth, maintenance and vitality of foundations and corporate giving programs.
  • Promote the ethical disposition of private resources for the public good.
  • Ensure the ability of grantmakers and FPN itself to fully perform their roles as equitable employers.

Advocacy & Public Policy Resources

Policy Update: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly

Publication date: 
01/2018

Session resources from #2018FPN Driven, FPN's 10th Annual Statewide Summit on Philanthropy.

Attendees analyzed current policy issues to better understand how they affect Florida grantmakers' ability to fund change and help improve quality of life in the Sunshine State.

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Beyond Traditional Scholarships

Publication date: 
12/2017

This policy brief examines creative scholarship models that meet the needs of underserved students, often by moving beyond monetary aid in the direction of wrap-around student supports. While continuing to provide financial relief for income-qualified students, a number of these programs couple academic supports along with financial assistance in order to address non-monetary needs that often impede completion.

Nonprofits Watch Tax Reform Shifts

Release Date: 
12/01/2017

Leaders in the nonprofit sector usually prefer to sit political discussions out, but at the most recent installment of SRQ’s SB2 symposium series, Philanthropic Agenda, leaders from the area foundations said they have been closely watching recent debates in Washington on tax reform, concerned about how any change in tax structure could impact deductions and incentives for giving.

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Charitable gifts of appreciated stock – will you seize the moment?

Release Date: 
11/06/2017

While no one knows what the new tax code will include, we do know that the tax code currently provides incentives for making charitable gifts of marketable securities.

When you make a gift of long-term appreciated securities to a public charity, including the Community Foundation of Palm Beach and Martin Counties, you can:

  • Claim a deduction equal to the fair market value of the securities.
  • Claim a deduction of up to 30 percent of your adjusted gross income for the year.
  • Potentially avoid any capital gain income on the appreciated value of the securities.
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Five ways the proposed tax plan impacts Florida

Release Date: 
11/03/2017

The proposed federal tax overhaul — outlined in depth in the 429-page "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act" — will affect every taxpayer differently. But in multiple ways, most Floridians will be less adversely impacted than others since Florida has no state income tax, no state estate tax and has both relatively affordable housing and median household incomes lower than most of the country.

Here’s a closer look at how five of the key provisions in the proposal could play out for Florida:

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A Highways Project for College Completion

Release Date: 
10/25/2017

A big boost to college completion would pay off for students and the economy, a new paper finds, but would substantially increase the federal deficit. 

A new paper from the American Academy of Arts & Sciences seeks to determine when the economic benefits to individuals and the national economy of such a completion boost would begin to outweigh investment costs.

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