Building Philanthropy to Build a Better Florida

How does a Census 2020 undercount affect your funding priorities?

Publication date: 
March, 2018

Children & Youth

Did you know that children under age five are the most likely of all age groups to be undercounted? In 2010, the undercount rate for young children was 4.6 percent, and more than 2.2 million in this age group were not included in the census results. 

Of that $600 billion, census data guide the distribution of billions for programs focused on children - $69 billion to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), $14 billion to Title I grants to local education agencies, $11 billion to the National School Lunch Program, $11 billion to the State Children’s Health Insurance Programs (S-CHIP), $11 billion to the National School Lunch Program, and $11 billion to special education grants (IDEA), among others.

Latinx communities

Latinx communities have been undercounted for decades, disadvantaging their families, communities, and neighborhoods. In 2010, Hispanic children under age five were overlooked at twice the rate of young non-Hispanic White children, and up to 400,000 young Latino children were missed. Young Latino men are also at risk of being undercounted, in part because they are overrepresented in the criminal justice system and also have lower rates of citizenship.

Black communities

The 2010 Census undercounted the Black population by more than 2 percent, and approximately 6.5 percent of young Black children were overlooked, roughly twice the rate for young non-Hispanic White children. Also startling, the net undercount of Black men between the ages of 30-49 was more than 10 percent.

AAPI communities

Roughly one in five Asian Americans live in hard-to-count census tracts.

Native communities

Today, roughly one quarter of Native Americans live in hard-to-count census tracts.

Education

Of that $600 billion, census data guide the distribution of billions for educational programs - $14 billion to Title I grants to local education agencies, $11 billion to the National School Lunch Program, and $11 billion to special education grants (IDEA), among others.

Housing

Of that $600 billion, census data guide the distribution of billions for housing programs - $1 billion to Section 8 housing choice vouchers and $9 billion to Section 8 Housing Assistance Payments Programs, among others. For more information on these federal programs and more, please see the Counting for Dollars analysis. 

Health & Wellness

Of that $600 billion, census data guide the distribution of billions for programs focused on ensuring healthy communities - $312 billion in Medicaid dollars, $69 billion to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), $64 billion in Medicare Part B dollars, $11 billion to the National School Lunch Program, and $11 billion to the State Children’s Health Insurance Programs (S-CHIP), among others.

For more information, including state-specific data, please visit the Leadership Conference for Civil and Human Rights Census webpage.
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